European Blue Cards

Kalypso Nikolaidis - EU
Photo by openDemocracy
Many people are asking about the European Blue Cards and they regularly search my site for more information, so I'll try to keep this page updated as I get more information.

Please keep in mind that the following countries have elected not to participate in the program.
  • United Kingdom
  • Ireland
  • Denmark
What follows is not an exhaustive list, but will be updated from time to time. I'll add more countries as I research them. Further, many countries have rushed to beat the EU deadline for implementing the Blue Card, so their requirements may seem vague and are subject to change.

Requirements per country.
  • Austria
    • University degree, minimum 3 years duration
    • Earn 150% of average Austrian salary
    • No equally qualified unemployed person registered with the Austrian Public Employment Service was available to be recruited by the potential employer.
  • Belgium
    • a higher education degree lasting which took at least three years to obtain.
    • an indefinite employment contract.
    • a salary of €49,995 per year (adjusted annually)
    • a valid travel document (presumably a passport, but this is unclear)
    • health insurance other than what your employer provides
  • Czech Republic
    • University degree
    • Earn 150% of average Czech salary
    • Intend to stay in the Czech Republic for five years
  • Finland
    • The work requires special qualifications or expertise.
    • The applicant has a higher education degree and is committed to a work contract of at least one year for highly qualified employment.
    • The applicant is paid a gross salary of minimum EUR 4,832 per month. This is the salary threshold applicable in Finland in 2012 and reviewed annually.
    • The terms and conditions of employment comply with existing regulations and collective agreements.
    • The applicant fulfils the general requirements outlined in the Aliens Act for the granting of a residence permit. For example, the applicant must have a valid travel document (such as a passport), and must not be the subject of an entry ban.
  • France
    • Three-year university degree or five years experience in your field
    • 1.5 times minimum salary (not yet determined as of this writing)
    • Minimum one-year employment contract
  • Germany
    • Have a job offer of at least €44K (€35K for some areas)
    • Have a University degree or equivalent experience.
  • Hungary
    • A "highly qualified" applicant
    • Have a job offer
  • Italy
    • A three year university degree or equivalent relevant experience
    • Have a job offer or work contract
  • Portugal
    • Have a minimum one-year employment offer or contract
    • Have a university degree of five years experience in your field
    • Be offered a salary of at least one and a half times the national average (around €2000 per month)
    • Have health insurance or be registered in their national health system
    • Must not be registered with the Portuguese Social Security system
    • Have a diploma or other proof of qualifications if it's an unregulated profession
    • Provide proof of certification if it is a regulated profession
  • Romania
    • The non-EU national must have a post-secondary educational qualification.
    • Be offered an annual salary that is at least four times the average gross annual salary for a similar position (yikes!).
    • For regulated professions, they candidate must possess the relevant educational qualifications or work experience.
  • Slovakia
    • University degree or five years experience in your field
    • Earn 150% of average Slovak salary
  • Spain
    • You must have a job offer of at least €2,750 per month
    • Have a minimum of a Bachelor's degree in your field or at least five years of experience
    • Proof of health insurance
    • Not be a "threat" to the EU (no criminals or people with highly infectious and dangerous diseases, please)
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